Tag Archives: decision-making

Eurozone decision-makers.

You know when an organisation, government or even a collection of governments is in trouble. The directors, senior management – the  leaders –  instead of  thinking strategically, concern themselves with day-to-day  issues.

Some call it Crisis Management.

That’s  exactly the zone in which  Eurozone politicians are currently operating.

I share the frustration of many others who have been watching the painfully slow process that Eurozone leaders have embarked upon in respect of the  terrible and complex financial mess which currently envelopes Europe. In spite of their rank, it would seem that many high-level politicians are incapable of reaching decisions within  an appropriate time-scale. Hence the sudden appearance of the ” kicking the can along the road“, ” into the long grass” and the other modern economic metaphors.

We are all frustrated.

The decision-making processes at National  and pan-National level are based on the depersonalised mechanistic value system of bureaucracy-based thinking.

However, we live in a very turbulent environment in which many activities – especially those affecting economies have become both differentiated as well as interdependent. In addition, there has been a  subtle change in organisational values which have become more based on humanistic-democratic ideals.

Political decision-making is now lagging behind and, under the guise of  “democracy”, refuses to become more adaptive and integrated in order to meet the rapidly changing economic and political environments which, from now on, will remain in a constant state of flux.

To put it simply – by the time politicians have provided a solution to a problem, they have been overtaken by the next issue which makes their initial solution redundant.

Decision-making groups should be thinking along organic rather than  mechanical lines and leadership and influence should fall to those who seem most able to solve the problems rather than to pre-programmed role expectations – especially those tainted by various flavours of political dogma.

We need adaptive temporary systems of diverse specialists, co-ordinated through say, non-political civil service link-pins to replace the current theory and practice of political bureaucracy.

Imagine, say our current economic issues being solved by individuals who are differentiated not according to rank or role but according to skills.

Certainly NOT politicians.

Currently, the same politicians who decide  how often our bins are emptied  or the number of hospital beds, are the same ones who make multi-billion economic decisions.

So, hopefully someone somewhere will have the will and the strength to realise that our present decision-making processes at “Macro (international) level” are outdated and ineffective.

The future is with more “Organic-adaptive” structures.

In addition, a combination of centralised and decentralised control mechanisms needs to be adopted – control mechanisms which recognise that , for instance, the various Euro states are significantly different from each other and therefore require different methods of both management and control.

Half-hearted attempts at control such as the largely discredited occasional bank stress-tests or toothless financial “authorities” are just that – cosmetic attempts.

The  solution to the flaky political decision-making process is not intellectual – it is organisational.